Tag Archives: wallace

Best poster at Disrupting Mobility

dm-posters

All 5 posters from our group presented at the summit, while the editor was assessing for the award.

We (Kutadinata, Das, Duffield, Jain, Kotagiri, Kulik, Navidikashani, Rigby, Ronald, Thompson, Wang and Winter, with Kelly and Wallace (Monash University)) have won the Best Poster Award at last week’s Disrupting Mobility, a Global Summit Investigating Sustainable Futures held in Cambridge, MA. Our awarded poster, Shared, Autonomous, Connected and Electric Urban Transport, showed results of various aspects of the ongoing ARC Linkage Project Integrating Mobility on Demand in Urban Transport Infrastructures.

Click on the following list to view the presented posters (as PDF files):

  1. R. Kutadinata, R. D. Das, C. Duffield, S. Jain, R. Kelly, R. Kotagiri, L. Kulik, Z. Navidikashani, M. Rigby, N. Ronald, R. Thompson, M. Wallace, Y. Wang, S. Winter, “Shared, autonomous, connected and electric urban transport.” – the big picture of the Linkage Project
  2. N. Ronald, R. Thompson, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “Optimizing shared on-demand passenger and goods mobility.”
  3. Z. Navidikashani, S. Winter, N. Ronald, R. Kutadinata, “Disruptive effects of demand responsive transport systems on mobility.”
  4. Y. Wang, N. Ronald, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “How much is trust: The cost and benefit of ridesharing with friends.”
  5. S. Jain, N. Ronald, R. Thompson, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “Exploring susceptibility of shared mobility in urban space.”

Disrupting Mobility Summit

The group submitted five abstracts for poster presentations in the Disrupting Mobility Summit: A global summit investigating sustainable futures to be held in November, Cambridge MA. All five were accepted. This summit is an interactive forum for leading executives, government representatives, and academics to discuss sustainable futures of transportation. It will bring together around 350 mobility experts from different continents. The program will tackle current trends in mobility by attracting thought leaders from companies, governments and academia. More details about the summit can be found here.

Here is the list of the posters we will present at the summit:

  1. R. Kutadinata, R. D. Das, C. Duffield, S. Jain, R. Kotagiri, L. Kulik, Z. Navidikashani, M. Rigby, N. Ronald, R. Thompson, M. Wallace, Y. Wang, S. Winter, “Shared, autonomous, connected and electric urban transport.” – the big picture of the Linkage Project
  2. Ronald, R. Thompson, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “Optimizing shared on-demand passenger and goods mobility.”
  3. Navidikashani, S. Winter, N. Ronald, R. Kutadinata, “Disruptive effects of demand responsive transport systems on mobility.”
  4. Wang, N. Ronald, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “How much is trust: The cost and benefit of ridesharing with friends.”
  5. S. Jain, N. Ronald, R. Thompson, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “Exploring susceptibility of shared mobility in urban space.”

#infrahack 2014

On 28 and 29 August 2014, Nicole Ronald participated in a NICTA-hosted infrastructure hackathon organised as part of the Australia 3.0 initiative. From our point of view, the main aims of participating were to understand more about how hackathons work and how we can encourage spatial and transport students to get involved, as well as having the opportunity to present some of our research to a different audience.

Nicole took the opportunity to work with the newly released Uber API, which permits real-time access to Uber data, and to test out a visualisation of launchpads, based on Michael Rigby’s PhD research. While Michael’s research focuses on ridesharing, where privacy is a major issue, Nicole identified convenience (shorter travel times, cheaper trips) and health (a door-to-door travel culture leads to less walking) as potential reasons why spatial flexibility is useful in the context of single-passenger taxis. As a one-person team, this provided a self-contained project that produced some early results: the diagram below showed that, when starting at the train station, walking a short distance could lead to being picked up quicker and a quicker ride. We intend to turn the static mockups into a live demo in the near future.

The winning team consisted of PhD students from our research partners in Computing and Information Systems, The University of Melbourne and a Monash student co-supervised by Mark Wallace, an iMoD investigator. They will be mentored to further develop their product and also received two return flights to Silicon Valley.

For more information about the hackathon, please visit infrahack.org.

News articles on Mathematics of Transportation Networks keynote

Ahead of his keynote at the Mathematics of Transportation Networks workshop in mid-June, several articles featuring Prof Mark Wallace talking about solutions to Melbourne’s transport problems (including demand-responsive transport) appeared in the media.

Monash News, Peak-hour problems? Just do the maths, 13 June 2013:

“Public transport take-up in Melbourne is limited because buses are too few and far between,” Professor Wallace said.

“However, the development of an adaptable bus scheme that uses communication devices and scheduling algorithms would make sure there’s a bus where and when you need it.”

The Age, Mathematics ‘the key’ to solving transport woes, 15 June 2013:

Imagine buses turning up every five minutes, and schedules that could deliver passengers to just about anywhere across the city. Impossible? Laughably expensive?

Professor Mark Wallace from the Monash University’s Faculty of Information Technology says it’s a goer. Mathematics, not massive infrastructure spending, is the key.

Prof Wallace also spoke to Red Symons on 774 ABC Melbourne Breakfast: ‘Cheap mathematics’ key to a quick commute, 18 June 2013.

Prof Wallace’s keynote, “Cheap solutions to the transport problem”, will be held on Tuesday 18 June from 5:30-7pm in Theatre S3, Building 25, at Monash University’s Clayton campus. The audio and slides are now available.

Mathematics of Transportation Networks, 19-21 June 2013

The AMSI Workshop on Mathematics of Transportation Networks will be held at Monash University on 19-21 June. Confirmed keynote speakers include Prof Mark Wallace (Monash), Prof Katsuhiro Nishinari (University of Tokyo) and Prof Serge Hoogendoorn (Delft University of Technology). More details and registration can be found at http://users.monash.edu.au/~mpetn/.