Tag Archives: usa

Disrupting Mobility Summit

The group submitted five abstracts for poster presentations in the Disrupting Mobility Summit: A global summit investigating sustainable futures to be held in November, Cambridge MA. All five were accepted. This summit is an interactive forum for leading executives, government representatives, and academics to discuss sustainable futures of transportation. It will bring together around 350 mobility experts from different continents. The program will tackle current trends in mobility by attracting thought leaders from companies, governments and academia. More details about the summit can be found here.

Here is the list of the posters we will present at the summit:

  1. R. Kutadinata, R. D. Das, C. Duffield, S. Jain, R. Kotagiri, L. Kulik, Z. Navidikashani, M. Rigby, N. Ronald, R. Thompson, M. Wallace, Y. Wang, S. Winter, “Shared, autonomous, connected and electric urban transport.” – the big picture of the Linkage Project
  2. Ronald, R. Thompson, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “Optimizing shared on-demand passenger and goods mobility.”
  3. Navidikashani, S. Winter, N. Ronald, R. Kutadinata, “Disruptive effects of demand responsive transport systems on mobility.”
  4. Wang, N. Ronald, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “How much is trust: The cost and benefit of ridesharing with friends.”
  5. S. Jain, N. Ronald, R. Thompson, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “Exploring susceptibility of shared mobility in urban space.”

A comparison of constrained and ad-hoc demand-responsive transportation systems

Ronald, N., Thompson, R.G., and Winter, S. A comparison of constrained and ad-hoc demand-responsive transportation systems, Proceedings of the 94th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC, January 2015.

Planning public transport services for areas of low population density is important to enable those without convenient travel options to travel. In these areas, transit vehicles frequently travel with low numbers or even no passengers on board, therefore incurring more cost to the transport providers. Demand-responsive transportation (DRT) services are a potential efficient mobility solution to this problem.

The choice of DRT scheme is important as different types of schemes might produce different performances in the same area with the same demand. While many DRT schemes have some constraints, for example, a fixed route or a fixed time, these impose constraints on users who are already constrained, for example, due to lack of access to a car or limited times to undertake activities. Removing the fixed constraint on time leads to evaluating the performance of an ad-hoc system.

matsim-ymThe aim of this paper is to investigate the change in performance between two different DRT schemes — a fixed-time but flexible route scheme and a completely ad-hoc scheme — using MATSim, a large-scale agent-based transport simulation, and real data from an existing fixed-time DRT service in rural Victoria, Australia. Experimentation showed that the schemes produced different outcomes for the operator and passengers, however the optimization algorithm is less important in areas of low demand. Higher levels of demand lead to extensive vehicle travel for an ad-hoc service, while altering the headways between fixed-time services could achieve a middle ground for operators and passengers.

This work is the first step towards developing a decision-support tool to evaluate different DRT schemes, in particular integrated with other modes of transport.

Please email the authors for a copy.

iMoD at TRB 2015

Nicole Ronald will be representing the iMoD team at the Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting, to be held next week in Washington, D.C. She will be presenting a paper on simulating demand-responsive transport using an existing fixed-time system in Yarrawonga/Mulwala, Australia and comparing it with a flexible-time system.

If you are interested in talking to Nicole about iMoD, contact her beforehand to set up a meeting time or drop by her lectern session at 8am Wednesday morning.

An opportunistic client user interface to support centralized ride share planning

Rigby, M., Krüger, A., Winter, S. (2013), An opportunistic client user interface to support centralized ride share planning, 21st ACM SIGSPATIAL International Conference on Advances in Geographic Information Systems (ACM SIGSPATIAL GIS 2013). ACM, Orlando, Florida, USA.

Existing ride sharing systems for commuting in urban environments are rigid. They rely on the communication of discrete, spatio-temporal constraints from both vehicle and client to perform ride-matching. From a client user perspective these approaches are problematic, leading to location-privacy issues and the use of additional communication channels for ad-hoc negotiation which cannot be immediately quantified. To account for these aspects, we develop a dynamic, intuitive interface technique called launch pads and a centralized system architecture, which together simplify the ride-matching process whilst preserving location-privacy. The results of two experiments reveal the latent potential existing within ride sharing systems if vehicle flexibility is quantified and incorporated into a representation of accessibility. The communication via launch pads provides a client with means to fully exploit this potential.

Please contact one of the authors for a copy.

Determining the Viability of a Demand-Responsive Transport System under Varying Demand Scenarios

Ronald, N., Thompson, R., Haasz, J., Winter, S. (2013), Determining the Viability of a Demand-Responsive Transport System under Varying Demand Scenarios, 6th ACM SIGSPATIAL International Workshop on Computational Transportation Science. ACM, Orlando, Florida, USA.

Collaborative transportation has been proposed as a potential solution to decrease congestion, reduce environmental effects of transport, and provide transportation options to those with no or restricted travel options. One such system is demand-responsive transport, in which passengers share a vehicle, usually a bus, but can be picked up or dropped off at a passenger-specified location and time. However, as these systems are expensive to implement and require long trials in order to gain traction, effective simulation is required in order to explore their viability before implementation. Although previous work has concentrated on the number of trip requests, the spatial distribution of these requests has not been considered. This paper explores four spatially-varying demand patterns — random, a many-to-one scenario, all short distance trips, all long distance trips — using a simulation of an ad-hoc demand-responsive bus system. It is shown that along with the number of trip requests and the requested trip distances, the spatial distribution of passengers does indeed have an effect on the level of service.

Please contact one of the authors for a copy.

ACM SIGSPATIAL GIS 2013, 5-8 November

Professor Stephan Winter and Michael Rigby will be attending the 21st ACM SIGSPATIAL International Conference on Advances in Geographic Information Systems (known in short as ACM SIGSPATIAL GIS 2013) in Orlando, Florida, USA.

Michael will be presenting his work on a client user interface to support centralized ride share planning in the main track of the conference, while Stephan will be presenting a paper undertaken with Dr Nicole Ronald, Dr Russell Thompson, and John Haasz on demand-responsive transportation viability in the 6th ACM SIGSPATIAL International Workshop on Computational Transportation Science.

Seamless Multi-Modal Connectivity Colloquium: Emerging Knowledge for Ridesharing

Prof Martin Savelsbergh recently spoke about dynamic ridesharing at the “Seamless Multi-Modal Connectivity Colloquium: Emerging Knowledge for Ridesharing” at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, USA. The colloquium was sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration and brought together representatives of government, industry, and academia.  Nine invited speakers helped set the scene during the day by discussing a wide range of topics, from road pricing to van pooling to slugging to real-time on-demand ridesharing.  Breakout sessions focused on obstacles preventing large-scale deployment of ridesharing and schemes to encourage or incentivise ridesharing.