Tag Archives: rigby

Mobility Patterns in Shared, Autonomous, and Connected Urban Transport

N. Ronald, Z. Navidi, Y. Wang, M. Rigby, S. Jain, R. Kutadinata, R. Thompson, and S. Winter, “Mobility patterns in shared, autonomous, and connected urban transport,” in Disrupting Mobility: Impacts of sharing economy and innovative transportation on cities, ser. Lecture Notes in Mobility, G. Meyer and S. Shaheen, Eds. Springer, 2017.

Abstract:

A number of recent technological breakthroughs promise disrupting urban mobility as we know it. But anticipating such disruption requires valid predictions: disruption implies that predictions cannot simply be extrapolations from a current state. Predictions have to consider the social, economic and spatial context of mobility. This paper studies mechanisms to support evidence-based transport planning in disrupting times. It presents various approaches, mostly based on simulation, to estimate the potential or real impact of the introduction of new paradigms on urban mobility, such as ad-hoc shared forms of transportation, au-tonomously driving electrical vehicles, or IT platforms coordinating and integrating modes of transportation.

A Continuous Representation of Ad Hoc Ridesharing Potential

M. Rigby; S. Winter; A. Krüger, “A Continuous Representation of Ad Hoc Ridesharing Potential,” in IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems , vol.PP, no.99, pp.1-11
doi: 10.1109/TITS.2016.2527052

Abstract:

Interacting with ridesharing systems is a complex spatiotemporal task. Traditional approaches rely on the full disclosure of a client’s trip information to perform ride matching. However during poor service conditions of low supply or high demand, this requirement may mean that a client cannot find any ride matching their intentions. To address this within real-world road networks, we extend our map-based opportunistic client user interface concept, i.e., launch pads, from a discrete to a continuous space–time representation of vehicle accessibility to provide a client with a more realistic choice set. To examine this extension under different conditions, we conduct two computational experiments. First, we extend our previous investigation into the effects of varying vehicle flexibility and population size on launch pads and a client’s probability of pick-up, describing the increased opportunity. Second, observing launch pads within a real-world road network, we analyze aspects of choice and propose necessary architecture improvements. The communication of ride share potential using launch pads provides a client with a simple yet flexible means of interfacing with on-demand transportation.

Best poster at Disrupting Mobility

dm-posters

All 5 posters from our group presented at the summit, while the editor was assessing for the award.

We (Kutadinata, Das, Duffield, Jain, Kotagiri, Kulik, Navidikashani, Rigby, Ronald, Thompson, Wang and Winter, with Kelly and Wallace (Monash University)) have won the Best Poster Award at last week’s Disrupting Mobility, a Global Summit Investigating Sustainable Futures held in Cambridge, MA. Our awarded poster, Shared, Autonomous, Connected and Electric Urban Transport, showed results of various aspects of the ongoing ARC Linkage Project Integrating Mobility on Demand in Urban Transport Infrastructures.

Click on the following list to view the presented posters (as PDF files):

  1. R. Kutadinata, R. D. Das, C. Duffield, S. Jain, R. Kelly, R. Kotagiri, L. Kulik, Z. Navidikashani, M. Rigby, N. Ronald, R. Thompson, M. Wallace, Y. Wang, S. Winter, “Shared, autonomous, connected and electric urban transport.” – the big picture of the Linkage Project
  2. N. Ronald, R. Thompson, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “Optimizing shared on-demand passenger and goods mobility.”
  3. Z. Navidikashani, S. Winter, N. Ronald, R. Kutadinata, “Disruptive effects of demand responsive transport systems on mobility.”
  4. Y. Wang, N. Ronald, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “How much is trust: The cost and benefit of ridesharing with friends.”
  5. S. Jain, N. Ronald, R. Thompson, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “Exploring susceptibility of shared mobility in urban space.”

Disrupting Mobility Summit

The group submitted five abstracts for poster presentations in the Disrupting Mobility Summit: A global summit investigating sustainable futures to be held in November, Cambridge MA. All five were accepted. This summit is an interactive forum for leading executives, government representatives, and academics to discuss sustainable futures of transportation. It will bring together around 350 mobility experts from different continents. The program will tackle current trends in mobility by attracting thought leaders from companies, governments and academia. More details about the summit can be found here.

Here is the list of the posters we will present at the summit:

  1. R. Kutadinata, R. D. Das, C. Duffield, S. Jain, R. Kotagiri, L. Kulik, Z. Navidikashani, M. Rigby, N. Ronald, R. Thompson, M. Wallace, Y. Wang, S. Winter, “Shared, autonomous, connected and electric urban transport.” – the big picture of the Linkage Project
  2. Ronald, R. Thompson, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “Optimizing shared on-demand passenger and goods mobility.”
  3. Navidikashani, S. Winter, N. Ronald, R. Kutadinata, “Disruptive effects of demand responsive transport systems on mobility.”
  4. Wang, N. Ronald, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “How much is trust: The cost and benefit of ridesharing with friends.”
  5. S. Jain, N. Ronald, R. Thompson, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “Exploring susceptibility of shared mobility in urban space.”

Enhancing launch pads for decision-making in intelligent mobility on-demand

Rigby, M. and Winter. S. (2015), Enhancing launch pads for decision-making in intelligent mobility on-demand. To appear in Journal of Location Based Services.

Interacting with an application for shared mobility is a complex spatio-temporal task, considering the degrees of freedom in planning and preferences together with the dynamics of supply. Traditional approaches also rely on the disclosure of inherently private, discrete information from both vehicle and client to perform ride matching. Catering for both aspects, we have previously suggested an intuitive interface concept, launch pads. In this paper we extend launch pads by enhancing the visualisation in a third dimension. This representation provides a client with a more detailed choice set which should lead to improved decision-making. To examine the value of this enhancement, we implement a multi-agent simulation and observe a client agent’s responses to 3D launch pads visualised according to three different fare models. Results show that a client’s flexibility in space is dependent on the fare model chosen, and it is this offering which can increase a client’s utility.

This paper is available from http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17489725.2015.1027752 or by contacting one of the authors.

GIES Research Conference 2014

IMG_1690Our current iMoD research students are members of the Graduate Infrastructure Engineering Society (GIES) at the University of Melbourne. Each year GIES organises a conference at which the majority of the 130 research students in the department present their work and produce a poster (students who started recently are exempt). Academic staff members, including Stephan Winter and Nicole Ronald, chair sessions and provide feedback to students.

iMoD presented four presentations during the day: Michael Rigby, Rahul Deb Das and Haifeng Zhao presented in 10 minute slots, while Shubham Jain, as a new student, gave a three minute overview of his planned research. On the day, he was awarded a best presentation prize, based on ratings from both academic staff and research students. Prior to the event, Shubham Jain participated in the Second Slide competition.

We look forward to returning next year with more presentations!

Click for Michael's full poster.

Click for Michael’s full poster.

Click for Rahul's full poster.

Click for Rahul’s full poster.

Enhancing Launch Pads for Decision Making in Intelligent Mobility On-Demand

Rigby, M.; Winter, S. (2014). Enhancing Launch Pads for Decision Making in Intelligent Mobility On-Demand (Extended Abstract), IEEE Intelligent Transportation Systems Conference. IEEE, Qingdao, China.

Interacting for shared mobility is a complex spatio-temporal task. Traditional approaches rely on the full disclosure of inherently private trip information to perform ride matching. Such a requirement however creates a rigid architecture with location privacy and service knowledge issues. Catering for these complexities, we extend previous work on an intuitive interface concept, launch pads, to address individual route choice by enhancing the visualization in a third dimension. This representation provides a client with a more detailed pick-up choice set. To examine the value of this enhancement, we implement a multi-agent simulation and observe a client agent’s responses to 3D launch pads visualized according to three different fare models. Results show that a client’s flexibility in space is dependent on the fare model chosen and by using the visualization they can increase their utility.

ITSC 2014, 8-11 October

iMoD is well-represented at this week’s IEEE Intelligent Transport Systems Conference in Qingdao, China.

Rahul Deb Das will present his work on automated detection of mode transfers based on GPS data. A poster by Michael Rigby on visualising pickup locations for ridesharing will also appear. Joint work by Stephan Winter with Iven Mareels (Dean, Melbourne School of Engineering) and IBM Research on personalized (leased) public transportation will also be presented.

Please feel free to contact Rahul or Stephan to organise a meeting about the iMoD project.