Tag Archives: kutadinata

Mobility Patterns in Shared, Autonomous, and Connected Urban Transport

N. Ronald, Z. Navidi, Y. Wang, M. Rigby, S. Jain, R. Kutadinata, R. Thompson, and S. Winter, “Mobility patterns in shared, autonomous, and connected urban transport,” in Disrupting Mobility: Impacts of sharing economy and innovative transportation on cities, ser. Lecture Notes in Mobility, G. Meyer and S. Shaheen, Eds. Springer, 2017.

Abstract:

A number of recent technological breakthroughs promise disrupting urban mobility as we know it. But anticipating such disruption requires valid predictions: disruption implies that predictions cannot simply be extrapolations from a current state. Predictions have to consider the social, economic and spatial context of mobility. This paper studies mechanisms to support evidence-based transport planning in disrupting times. It presents various approaches, mostly based on simulation, to estimate the potential or real impact of the introduction of new paradigms on urban mobility, such as ad-hoc shared forms of transportation, au-tonomously driving electrical vehicles, or IT platforms coordinating and integrating modes of transportation.

24th ACM SIGSPATIAL, San Francisco Bay Area 2016

Stephan Winter, Ronny Kutadinata, Yaoli Wang, and Maria Vasardani attended the 24th ACM SIGSPATIAL held in Burlingame, CA.

20161102_214556 Y. Wang, R. Kutadinata, and S. Winter

The team had several papers accepted, both in workshops and the main conference. They are:

Congratulations to the team!

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R. Kutadinata presenting the paper “Autonomous car and ride sharing: flexible road trains.”

 

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O. Wolfson, R. Kutadinata, and S. Winter during award ceremony.

Cost-efficient Co-modal Ride-sharing Scheme Through Anticipatory Dynamic Optimisation

R. Kutadinata, R. Thompson, and S. Winter, “Cost-efficient Co-modal Ride-sharing Scheme Through Anticipatory Dynamic Optimisation,” in Proceedings of the 23rd ITS World Congress, 2016.

Abstract:

This paper considers the vehicle routing problem when dealing with a co-modal demand-responsive transport service. The vehicles in the service are shared among two modes of customers, passengers and goods deliveries. In particular, this paper develops a conceptual model in order to explore the performance of such a service with two different optimisation algorithms, namely deterministic re-optimisation and the Multiple Scenario Approach (MSA). An important contribution of this work is the formulation of the co-modality as a pick-up and delivery problem with time windows (PDPTW). In addition, the effect of using various constraints and penalty functions in the optimisation formulation will be investigated. The experiment will be carried out in a vehicle routing simulation developed in MATLAB by using a demand scenario obtained from the Victorian Integrated Survey of Travel and Activity (VISTA) data. In the model, the performance of the algorithms is measured by the operating cost, the number of customers whose time-window constraints are violated, and the average wait and detour time.

The University of Melbourne booth at the 23rd ITS World Congress, Melbourne

The University of Melbourne had a booth at the 23rd ITS World Congress, held in Melbourne, which we helped organised. The purpose of the booth is to showcase the ITS research  capabilities at the university and attract interest from industry for potential collaboration.

The booth had many visitors and can be considered a success. There are some discussions for potential projects resulting from the engagement.

A flyer has been produced for this purpose, which can be downloaded here. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any inquiries.

In addition, Ronny presented his findings on anticipatory algorithm for shared passenger-freight DRT services, the details of which can be found here.

Autonomous car and ride sharing: flexible road trains

N. Agatz, A. Bazzan, R. Kutadinata, D. Mattfeld, M. Sester, S. Winter, and O. Wolfson, “Autonomous car and ride sharing: flexible road trains,” (vision paper), in Proceedings of the 24th ACM SIGSPATIAL, 2016.

This paper won the Best Vision Paper award and the CCC Blue Sky Ideas award. Read more in the CCC website.

Abstract:

Since in many cities transport infrastructure is operating at or beyond capacity, novel approaches to organize urban mobility are gaining attraction. However, assessing the benefi ts of a measure that has disruptive capacity in a complex system requires a carefully designed research. This paper takes a recent idea for urban mobility – flexible road trains – and illustrates the computational and research challenges of realizing its full potential and describing its social, ecological and economical impact.

Activity-based ridesharing: Increasing flexibility by time geography

Y. Wang, R. Kutadinata, and S. Winter, “Activity-based ridesharing: Increasing flexibility by time geography,” in Proceedings of the 24th ACM SIGSPATIAL, 2016.

Abstract:

Ridesharing is an emerging travel mode that reduces the total amount of traffic on the road by combining people’s travels together. While present ridesharing algorithms are tripbased, this paper aims to achieve signi cantly higher matching chances by a novel, activity-based algorithm. The algorithm expands the potential destination choice set by considering alternative destinations that are within given space-time budgets and would provide a similar activity function as the originals. In order to address the increased combinatorial complexity of trip chains, the paper introduces an efficient space-time filter on the foundations of time geography to search for accessible resources. Globally optimal matching is achieved by binary linear programming. The ridesharing algorithm is tested with a series of realistic scenarios of diff erent population sizes. The encouraging results demonstrate that the matching rate by activity-based ridesharing is signi cantly increased from the baseline scenario of traditional trip-based ridesharing.

Best poster at Disrupting Mobility

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All 5 posters from our group presented at the summit, while the editor was assessing for the award.

We (Kutadinata, Das, Duffield, Jain, Kotagiri, Kulik, Navidikashani, Rigby, Ronald, Thompson, Wang and Winter, with Kelly and Wallace (Monash University)) have won the Best Poster Award at last week’s Disrupting Mobility, a Global Summit Investigating Sustainable Futures held in Cambridge, MA. Our awarded poster, Shared, Autonomous, Connected and Electric Urban Transport, showed results of various aspects of the ongoing ARC Linkage Project Integrating Mobility on Demand in Urban Transport Infrastructures.

Click on the following list to view the presented posters (as PDF files):

  1. R. Kutadinata, R. D. Das, C. Duffield, S. Jain, R. Kelly, R. Kotagiri, L. Kulik, Z. Navidikashani, M. Rigby, N. Ronald, R. Thompson, M. Wallace, Y. Wang, S. Winter, “Shared, autonomous, connected and electric urban transport.” – the big picture of the Linkage Project
  2. N. Ronald, R. Thompson, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “Optimizing shared on-demand passenger and goods mobility.”
  3. Z. Navidikashani, S. Winter, N. Ronald, R. Kutadinata, “Disruptive effects of demand responsive transport systems on mobility.”
  4. Y. Wang, N. Ronald, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “How much is trust: The cost and benefit of ridesharing with friends.”
  5. S. Jain, N. Ronald, R. Thompson, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “Exploring susceptibility of shared mobility in urban space.”

Disrupting Mobility Summit

The group submitted five abstracts for poster presentations in the Disrupting Mobility Summit: A global summit investigating sustainable futures to be held in November, Cambridge MA. All five were accepted. This summit is an interactive forum for leading executives, government representatives, and academics to discuss sustainable futures of transportation. It will bring together around 350 mobility experts from different continents. The program will tackle current trends in mobility by attracting thought leaders from companies, governments and academia. More details about the summit can be found here.

Here is the list of the posters we will present at the summit:

  1. R. Kutadinata, R. D. Das, C. Duffield, S. Jain, R. Kotagiri, L. Kulik, Z. Navidikashani, M. Rigby, N. Ronald, R. Thompson, M. Wallace, Y. Wang, S. Winter, “Shared, autonomous, connected and electric urban transport.” – the big picture of the Linkage Project
  2. Ronald, R. Thompson, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “Optimizing shared on-demand passenger and goods mobility.”
  3. Navidikashani, S. Winter, N. Ronald, R. Kutadinata, “Disruptive effects of demand responsive transport systems on mobility.”
  4. Wang, N. Ronald, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “How much is trust: The cost and benefit of ridesharing with friends.”
  5. S. Jain, N. Ronald, R. Thompson, R. Kutadinata, S. Winter, “Exploring susceptibility of shared mobility in urban space.”